SI 2015: Breakout Session #2

Session 2A

Title

Translating Knowledge into Practice: Teaching Teachers to Use Self Management to Improve Classroom Management Practices

Dr. Jennifer Freeman, Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Connecticut

Tiers 1, 2, 3 – Application

Descriptor

Hear about recent research on supporting teachers’ classwide SW-PBS practices and learn self-management strategies to improve implementation. Receive tools and an opportunity to practice developing a self-management plan.

Session 2B

Title

Process of Observations to Drive Effective Classroom Practices Implementation

Daniel Rector, Assistant Principal; Hilary Myers and Hilary Trammell, Teachers; West Middle School, Columbia 93 School District; Sarah Moore, Research Assistant, MU Center for PBS, University of Missouri

Tiers 1, 2, 3 – Application

Descriptor

Effective practices within the classroom is a critical component of SW-PBS implementation. The fidelity of these classroom systems serve as a predictor of sustainability and student outcomes with the strongest predictors being regular acknowledgement of appropriate student behaviors, matching instruction with student ability and having access to additional support. Learn about a sample observation protocol that was used to provide ongoing monitoring of classroom practices and as a data-decision tool to guide staff coaching.

Session 2C

Title

Utilizing Positive Specific Feedback Across all Three Tiers

Danielle Starkey and Deanna Maynard, Tier 2-3 Consultants, MO SW-PBS

Tiers 1, 2, 3 – Application

Descriptor

Specific positive feedback by teachers is a critical piece of SW-PBS implementation at Tiers 1-3. Effective specific positive feedback consists of: stating the  expectation, specifically describing the behavior and can include a positive consequence. Research recommends a ratio of 4:1; four comments in response to desired student behavior to one response to student misbehavior. Learn how to establish and sustain staff use of specific positive feedback at a ratio of at least 4:1 across Tiers 1-3. Receive a guide with examples of specific positive feedback, frequently asked questions and self-monitoring strategies to increase this practice in
every classroom from the first day of school.

Session 2D

Title

Tier 1.5. and Beyond

Jennifer L. Jorel and Suzan M. Wilson, Teachers; Saeger Middle School, Francis Howell R-III School District; Karen Westhoff, Regional SW-PBS Consultant, St. Louis RPDC, Education Plus; Deb Childs, Tier 2-3 Consultant, MO SW-PBS

Tiers 1, 2 – Enrichment

Descriptor

Learn how one school discovered that by placing an intentional, focused effort on students who meet “at-risk” requirements, students who met Tier 2/3 criteria in years past, or students who are beginning to spike, they are frequently successful in thwarting students from reaching Tier 2. This concerted effort was jokingly called Tier 1.5, and the name stuck. Learn about highly effective home visit strategies, PBS 101 for students program and the various ways to engage your entire school community in early behavior prevention efforts, including how to deal with reluctant staff members.

Session 2E

Title

Tier 2 Overview and Readiness

Diane Feeley, Tier 2-3 Consultant, MO SW-PBS

Tier 2 – Foundation

Descriptor

What are the key features of Tier 2? Does your school have everything in place for the development of Tier 2 systems, data and practices? How will you know if you’re ready? Learn to identify key features of a Tier 2 system, characteristics of maximally effective interventions and how to determine readiness for development of Tier 2.

Session 2F

Title

Student Intervention Team (Tier 2) Implementation and Maintenance

Jamie Goforth, Assistant Principal; Carla Mobley, Tier 2 Coach; Jalana Kinde, Tier 2 Representative; Boswell Elementary School, Lebanon R-III School District; Jo Ann Anderson, Tier 2-3 Consultant, MO SW-PBS

Tier 2 – Application

Descriptor

The SIT team at Boswell Elementary School has 10+ years experience. Their current goals are to provide improved ways to continue this work while bringing new staff members along. Learn how to implement, organize and sustain a Tier 2 team at the intermediate elementary level.

Session 2G

Title

Establishing a Common Purpose, Ownership and Common Expectations

Dr. Lance McClard, Principal, North Elementary School; Shauna Criddle, Principal, Gordanville Elementary School; Dr. Jessica Maxwell, Principal, South Elementary School; Samantha Trankler, Principal and Krista Birk, Assistant Principal, West Lane Elementary School; Shanna Wilson, Principal, Orchard Drive Elementary School; Jackson R-II School District; Cynthia Matthew, Regional SW-PBS Consultant, Southeast RPDC

Tiers 1, 2, 3 – Application

Descriptor

Building principals of five elementary buildings discuss their journey within the district to establish and maintain a common purpose of a student centered learning environment. Understand the role the administrator takes within a SW-PBS school and learn steps to create and maintain a core SW-PBS team charged with the responsibility of identifying and communicating the “why” of what we do and clarifying common expectations. A model of establishing a district-level school positive behavior support leadership team to increase support, visibility and implementation will be shared.

Resources

2G_SI2015

Session 2H

Title

ISIS-SWIS

Dr. Kelsey Morris, Senior Research Assistant, PBISApps, University of Oregon

Tier 3 – Foundation

Descriptor

Learn about ISIS-SWIS, a decision system for students receiving more intensive supports for academic, social or mental health services. Using ISIS-SWIS can define data-collection measures, upload and store documentation, and summarize data for decision making. *Note ISIS-SWIS is a fee-based online system and is part of the SWIS Suite.

Resources

2H_SI2015

Session 2I

Title

Trauma, Self-Regulation and School Problems: Teaching Traumatized and Emotionally Dysregulated Students

Gerald Cox, Licensed Clinical Psychologist

Tiers 1, 2, 3 – Foundation

Descriptor

Adverse childhood events are much more prevalent and have a much greater impact on educational achievement and classroom behaviors than previously realized. Traditional classroom behavior management strategies are often not only ineffective but counterproductive with students who have experienced relational traumas. Understand the widespread prevalence of adverse childhood events, their impact on the developing brain and the resulting impact on educational performance and classroom behaviors.

Resources

2I_SI2015

2I_SI2015

Session 2J

Title

The D.R.A.F.T. (Developing Relationships and Focused Teaching)

Brian Moler, Assistant Principal; John Kessinger and Matt Locke, Teachers; Reed Springs High School, Reed Springs R-IV School District; Betty Ennis, Tier 2-3 Consultant, MO SW-PBS

Tier 2 – Application

Descriptor

The D.R.A.F.T. is a program intended to increase rigor and relevance in the classroom and improve the culture and climate of the school through meaningful relationships. Teachers “draft” students for specific interventions based on student needs and teacher strengths for a 30-minute period built into the school day. Focus is on academic and social/emotional needs, allowing for tailoring of interventions. PLC time stresses collaboration, communication and early interventions to ensure that no student falls through the cracks.

Resources

2J_HO1_SI2015